Archive for the gala Category

We’ll need no castles in Spain

Posted in diva, gala, opera news, tfpdafoaitfoe on October 10, 2007 by lacieca

Autumn in New York means many things to many people. To some, it’s glittering crowds and shimmering clouds in canyons of steel; others reflect upon upon jaded roués and gay divorcées who lunch at the Ritz. To singers it’s the height of the allergy and cancellation season.

But to us, the most echt of all opera lovers, autumn in New York heralds the announcement of “The F. Paul Driscoll Awards for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Excellence.” Luminaries receiving this accolade for 2007 include Stephanie Blythe, Olga Borodina, Thomas Hampson, Julius Rudel and “retired soprano legend” Leontyne Price.

TFPDAFOAITFOE, or, to use its perhaps less amusing but certainly cumbersome original title “The Opera News Awards,” will hold its annual gala reception and dinner at the Hotel Pierre in New York City on Thursday, January 24, 2008. In what La Cieca applauds as a heart-warming effort at outreach to the lesbian community, the ceremony will boast Sigourney Weaver (above) and Susan Graham (not pictured) as co-hostpersons.

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She got through all of last year and she’s here

Posted in bumbry, cher public, gala, mp3 on July 23, 2007 by lacieca

More proof (as if any were needed) that 70 is the new 50: “Viva la Diva: Gala zum 70. Geburtstag von Grace Bumbry.” The concert (performed at the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival on July 17 of this year) featured the septuagenarian siren in a demanding program of arias and scenes from Aida, Ernani, Les Troyens and the complete third act of Tosca!

La Cieca offers her cher public a pair of Querschnitten from this historic concert:

“Ritorna vincitor!” from Aida

“Ah! Je vais mourir” from Les Troyens

The gala continues

Posted in caballe, daniels, fleming, gala, giordani, mattila, millo, podcast, ruth ann swenson, villazon on April 13, 2007 by lacieca

In further celebration of our 200th podcast, La Cieca presents a second program of superstars and their superstardom. Featured in the current episode of Unnatural Acts of Opera are Karita Mattila, Rolando Villazon, Renee Fleming, Dorothy Kirsten, Renata Scotto, Elena Obratszova, David Daniels, Ruth Ann Swenson, Renata Tebaldi, Giuseppe diStefano, Marilyn Horne, Montserrat Caballe, Kostas Paskalis, Alain Vanzo, Krassimira Stoyanova, Marcello Giordani and Aprile Millo.

And don’t forget Part One, starring Maria Callas, Cesare Valletti, Rosanna Carteri, Nicolai Ghiaurov, Tito Gobbi, Birgit Nilsson, Leonie Rysanek, Alfredo Kraus, Jeannette Pilou, Cesare Siepi, Jessye Norman, Joan Sutherland and Leontyne Price.

Sing a little, chat a little

Posted in chat, cher public, gala, met, netrebko, sirius, villazon on April 3, 2007 by lacieca

La Cieca (not pictured) reminds her cher public that tonight’s 40th Anniversary of the Met at Lincoln Center gala will be the subject of an online chat right here at parterre.com.

The program, starring Anna Netrebko and Rolando Villazón, begins at 7:00 PM and so the chat room will open at 6:45. Maestro Bertrand de Billy will lead the duo in staged performances of La bohème, Act I (with Mariusz Kwiecien as Marcello); Manon Act III, scene 2 (with Samuel Ramey as the Comte des Grieux); and L’elisir d’amore Act II with Mr. Kwiecien as Belcore and Alessandro Corbelli as Dulcamara.

Met Barbiere on YouTube

Posted in bel canto, gala, met, telecast, youtube on March 27, 2007 by lacieca

… though not the one from last weekend!

Bel canto lushinghier

Posted in 2012, barihunk, bel canto, damrau, dessay, diva, filth, fleming, florez, gala, gelb, gheorghiu, giordani, la cieca ci guarda la cieca ci vede, levine, met, netrebko, villazon on December 28, 2006 by lacieca

La Cieca thought that now that Puritani has opened at the Met, it’s as good a time as any to review the company’s (rumored) bel canto plans for the next five years or so. Remember, everything in this life is uncertain, so please regard these “predictions” as the gossip they are.
Anyway, La Cieca hopes you’ll find plenty of fodder for discussion in the following grafs.

Next season (as you all know) opening night will be a new production of Lucia di Lammermoor starring Natalie Dessay. Sharing the role of Edgardo will be a trio of toothsome tenors: Marcello Giordani, Marcelo Alvarez and Giuseppe Filianoti. Further upping the hunk quotient will be Mariusz Kwiecien and John Relyea. The Mary Zimmerman production will be led (on opening night at least) by James Levine.

Per La Cieca’s sources, Mad Lucy will pay a couple of return visits in following seasons, first with Anna Netrebko and Rolando Villazon in the fall of ’08, and then with Mlle. Dessay again sometime in 2010. Ze French diva gets the unusual honor of opening two new productions next season, the Lucia, of course, and then a new Fille du Regiment opposite puppylicious Juan Diego Florez.
JDF and Dessay reunite in the fall of 2008 for a new Sonnambula. The tenor will reprise his Tonio during the 2009-2010 season, this time with Diana Damrau as Marie. And that pairing will be repeated in the Met premiere of Rossini’s Le Comte Ory the following season.
Now, jumping back to 2009 again, that’s when the new production of Rossini’s Armida is skedded, featuring of course Renee Fleming and (among other tenors) Eric Cutler.
And then comes 2012, aka “The Year of the Jackpot,” when just possibly we will hear the Tudor Trifecta (Fleming, Netrebko and Angela Gheorghiu) as well as a new Giulliame Tell (presumably for Giordani) plus revivals of L’elisir (Netrebko, Florez, Kwiecien), L’italiana and Semiramide.
Oh, and for Druid fanciers, the outlook is not quite so rosy: a single revival of Norma next season with Dolora Zajick, Maria Guleghina and Franco Farina — or, as Mme. Vera Galupe-Borzkh might sum it up: “Can Belto, Can’t Belto and Can’t Canto.”

Avant-garde

Posted in aida, alagna, callas, cher public, fleming, gala, met, youtube on December 13, 2006 by lacieca

Well, it had to happen sooner or later, and so it did happen, sometime between last night and tonight. La Cieca has decided she’s taking Roberto Alagna‘s side in The Scandale.

Yes, yes, La Cieca hears your gasps and snorts of disbelief and contempt, but you know, cher public, La Cieca is, deep in her bleeding heart, always on the side of the underdog. And, yes, by this point Alagna is the underdog.

Of course La Cieca knows that Alagna brought this upon himself. But in life (as in opera) there are very few pure heroes and villains. Do we not, for example, weep for Manon as she so movingly expires, whether at Le Havre or in the desert near New Orleans? And yes, she brought most of her misery upon herself. If the poor dear thing had even a shred of morality, she could have saved everyone (particularly Des Grieux) whole cartloads of heartache. But morality wasn’t what Manon was about; that’s not how she was made.

Is it supposed to be news that Roberto Alagna is a hothead? Does he have a track record of behaving coolly and rationally in a crisis? Has he ever been known to say, “no comment” when asked a question, any question? So why is everyone so shocked, shocked to witness what should be — by now — familiar behavior?

La Cieca is of the “fool me once” school, frankly, when it comes to opera singers. And, to tell the truth, it’s Stéphane Lissner who ought to be saying “shame on me” these days — at least to himself. In other words, Lissner is not helping the situation by acting so inflexibly, refusing to negotiate with Alagna over his return to the theater.

Now, please understand, La Cieca is not saying that Lissner should simply cave; rather, she’s suggesting that there is a win-win possible here, and Lissner is dropping the ball. It’s not a particularly impressive act to fire a recalcitrant artist; basically the lawyers and the press office will have to do all the heavy lifting anyway. A great impresario is one who can bring an unruly tenor to heel, and, what’s more, trick the tenor into thinking it was his own idea.

Take Rudolf Bing with Franco Corelli, for example. No artist was more “difficult” than Corelli, and yet Bing got him onstage for over 300 performances — far more than he sang anywhere else in the world. Bing once joked that handling Corelli was what he was “underpaid” for, but in fact, that’s what a general manager is supposed to do, to get important artists on the stage and before the public. Firing a singer is, in a sense, an admission of failure. In fact, Bing even admitted in later years that his inability to come to terms with Maria Callas was one of the worst blots on his record as General Manager of the Met.

In contrast, consider Lissner’s inflexible behavior in the past few days. Yes, he’s showing everyone who’s boss, but meanwhile, he’s presenting a sold-out “gala” Aida with Walter Fraccaro and Antonello Palombi alternating in the star tenor role. Yeah, I’m sure the audiences who have to sit through that are saying to themselves, “Well, it’s excruciating, sure, but at least somebody put his foot down! Thank God La Scala has returned to its artistic mission of upholding the Rule of Law!”

Since last night, a couple more tidbits of information have surfaced suggesting that Alagna’s sense of persecution is not 100% paranoia. To begin with, the video of the walkout.

Doesn’t it strike you as odd that a television station should have such access to video footage that was recorded for DVD release? Does anyone think that someone in the Decca crew might have leaked it? Hardly. The only way the clip of Alagna’s “exit” could have emerged was for the management of La Scala (i.e., Lissner) to make it available. And why ever would an opera house want to publicize so sordid an event? (Can you imagine, for example, that the Met’s press department would supply the media with a sound bite of Domingo’s being booed last week?) The answer is simple: La Scala is actively working to make Alagna appear the bad guy.

Furthermore, doesn’t Palombi’s “save” strike you as just a bit too miraculous? How often does it happen that the second cover is standing in the wings, warmed up and ready to bound onto the stage, when there is no prior warning that the artist he’s covering might be in vocal distress? In other words, did Palombi know in advance that Alagna might be booed?

If you must know, La Cieca’s tipping point on this issue was reading Norman Lebrecht‘s predictably anti-artist and pro-bandwagon comments this morning. The Alagnas are difficult, the Alagnas are self-absorbed, lot of opera houses are pissed off at the Alagnas, but of course this slap in the face of the honorable public of Milan is the last, the very last straw.

Well, Norma, your middlebrow maunderings are wrong yet again. This might be the end of the line for the Alagnas — if they were the sort of dull, uninspired singers that mostly populate the world of opera today. But they’re not. Despite their vocal flaws and outrageous behavior, they are something special and rare. The main reason that opera is in such dire straits today is that nobody wants to shell out hundreds of dollars for a ticket to hear some well-behaved mediocrity. (That is, unless that mediocrity’s name is Fleming, but she’s not working much at La Scala lately either.)

La Cieca will have more to say about this later; cher public, do chime in.